iPhone and iPad Users can now download and install iOS 11 Beta 3

If you want to check an app IOS 11 on your phone then what are you waiting for? This experience is going to change your perspective and you will be able to enhance the performance of the phone as well.

You will be download this app on your iPhone and IPad. If you are looking for IOS 11 download trick, then this article is particularly because here we’re going to tell you the way to download it on your phone and you can start using it with ease.

FIRST STEP

First, you need to connect your required device with the IOS or MAC or you can connect your device with the PC. It’s time to fire up the iTunes. You should check the compatibility of the device as well because if your device has virus or problem then it will not get connected.

You should make sure first about the compatibility of the device.

SECOND STEP

You can see the menu bar and now you have to tap on the option device.

THIRD STEP

Noe for the backup option you have to click on the backup and then encrypt backup, enter the password. Make sure you have selected all the apps before backing up and now you have all the data saved on your other device.

FOURTH STEP

In order to open the preference, go to the option command to. It will take you further to the other options. You can also tap on the iTunes and further on the preference. This will take you to the same page as well.

FIFTH STEP

Tap on the devices and then on the backup. The next option you have to click on is the archive. You have downloaded an app successfully.

Now it’s time to know how to register yourself for using an app.

REGISTER STEP 1

Go to the web developer.apple.com from your IOS device. Go to the download new betas option.

REGISTER STEP 2

Now sign in with your developer’s account, enter your username and password. To expand the download section, tap on the 11-beta section and go for the down arrow sign.

REGISTER STEP 3

To configure the app, select download.

REGISTER STEP 4

The next thing you are going to see is that beta section 11 will show your profile. You have to enter the passcode and install.

REGISTER STEP 5

You have to keep the check on the rules and regulations and tap on install. Now restart your device.

Now you can install an app by opening setting in your device and click on the software update after going to the general. Go to the download and install, enter the passcode and put a check on their terms and conditions. After getting agree to all the notifications your device is ready to reboot.

Now after rebooting the system of the device you are all set to run the new IOS 11.

After unlocking your device go to the continue. It will show the continue option where you have to add user Id of Apple and password.  You are all set to get started the app on your device. If you need some more information, you may click this link.…

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AT&T Assembly Syntax

This article is a ‘quick-n-dirty’ introduction to the AT&T assembly language syntax, as implemented in the GNU Assembler as(1). For the first timer the AT&T syntax may seem a bit confusing, but if you have any kind of assembly language programming background, it’s easy to catch up once you have a few rules in mind. I assume you have some familiarity to what is commonly referred to as the INTEL-syntax for assembly language instructions, as described in the x86 manuals. Due to its simplicity, I use the NASM (Netwide Assembler) variant of the INTEL-syntax to cite differences between the formats.

The GNU assembler is a part of the GNU Binary Utilities (binutils), and a back-end to the GNU Compiler Collection. Although as is not the preferred assembler for writing reasonably big assembler programs, its a vital part of contemporary Unix-like systems, especially for kernel-level hacking. Often criticised for its cryptic AT&T-style syntax, it is argued that as was written with an emphasis on being used as a back-end to GCC, with little concern for “developer-friendliness”. If you are an assembler programmer hailing from an INTEL-Syntax background, you’ll experience a degree of stifling with regard to code-readability and code-generation. Nevertheless, it must be stated that, many operating systems’ code-base depend on as as the assembler for generating low-level code.

The Basic Format

The structure of a program in AT&T-syntax is similar to any other assembler-syntax, consisting of a series of directives, labels, instructions – composed of a mnemonic followed by a maximum of three operands. The most prominent difference in the AT&T-syntax stems from the ordering of the operands.

For example, the general format of a basic data movement instruction in INTEL-syntax is,

mnemonic	destination, source

whereas, in the case of AT&T, the general format is

mnemonic	source, destination

To some (including myself), this format is more intuitive. The following sections describe the types of operands to AT&T assembler instructions for the x86 architecture.

Registers

All register names of the IA-32 architecture must be prefixed by a ‘%’ sign, eg. %al,%bx, %ds, %cr0 etc.

mov	%ax, %bx

The above example is the mov instruction that moves the value from the 16-bit register AX to 16-bit register BX.

Literal Values

All literal values must be prefixed by a ‘$’ sign. For example,

 		
mov	$100,	%bx
mov	$A,	%al

The first instruction moves the the value 100 into the register AX and the second one moves the numerical value of the ascii A into the AL register. To make things clearer, note that the below example is not a valid instruction,

mov	%bx,	$100

as it just tries to move the value in register bx to a literal value. It just doesn’t make any sense.

Memory Addressing

In the AT&T Syntax, memory is referenced in the following way,

segment-override:signed-offset(base,index,scale)

parts of which can be omitted depending on the address you want.

%es:100(%eax,%ebx,2)

Please note that the offsets and the scale should not be prefixed by ‘$’. A few more examples with their equivalent NASM-syntax, should make things clearer,

GAS memory operand			NASM memory operand
------------------			-------------------

100					[100]
%es:100					[es:100]
(%eax)					[eax]
(%eax,%ebx)				[eax+ebx]
(%ecx,%ebx,2)				[ecx+ebx*2]
(,%ebx,2)				[ebx*2]
-10(%eax)				[eax-10]
%ds:-10(%ebp)				[ds:ebp-10]

Example instructions,

mov	%ax,	100
mov	%eax,	-100(%eax)

The first instruction moves the value in register AX into offset 100 of the data segment register (by default), and the second one moves the value in eax register to [eax-100].

Operand Sizes

At times, especially when moving literal values to memory, it becomes neccessary to specify the size-of-transfer or the operand-size. For example the instruction,

mov	$10,	100

only specfies that the value 10 is to be moved to the memory offset 100, but not the transfer size. In NASM this is done by adding the casting keyword byte/word/dword etc. to any of the operands. In AT&T syntax, this is done by adding a suffix – b/w/l – to the instruction. For example,

movb	$10,	%es:(%eax)

moves a byte value 10 to the memory location [ea:eax], whereas,

movl	$10,	%es:(%eax)

moves a long value (dword) 10 to the same place.

A few more examples,

movl	$100, %ebx
pushl	%eax
popw	%ax

Control Transfer Instructions

The jmp, call, ret, etc., instructions transfer the control from one part of a program to another. They can be classified as control transfers to the same code segment (near) or to different code segments (far). The possible types of branch addressing are – relative offset (label), register, memory operand, and segment-offset pointers.

Relative offsets, are specified using labels, as shown below.

label1:
	.
	.
  jmp	label1

Branch addressing using registers or memory operands must be prefixed by a ‘*’. To specify a “far” control tranfers, a ‘l’ must be prefixed, as in ‘ljmp’, ‘lcall’, etc. For example,

GAS syntax			NASM syntax
==========			===========

jmp	*100			jmp  near [100]
call	*100			call near [100]
jmp	*%eax			jmp  near eax
jmp	*%ecx			call near ecx
jmp	*(%eax)			jmp  near [eax]
call	*(%ebx)			call near [ebx]
ljmp	*100			jmp  far  [100]
lcall	*100			call far  [100]
ljmp	*(%eax)			jmp  far  [eax]
lcall	*(%ebx)			call far  [ebx]
ret				retn
lret				retf
lret $0x100			retf 0x100

Segment-offset pointers are specified using the following format:

jmp	$segment, $offset

For example:

jmp	$0x10, $0x100000

If you keep these few things in mind, you’ll catch up real soon. As for more details on the GNU assembler, you could try the documentation.…

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Concurrent Remote Desktop Sessions in Windows XP SP2

I mentioned before that Windows XP does not allow concurrent sessions for its Remote Desktop feature. What this means is that if a user is logged on at the local console, a remote user has to kick him off (and ironically, this can be done even without his permission) before starting work on the box. This is irritating and removes much of the productivity that Remote Desktop brings to Windows. Read on to learn how to remove that limitation in Windows XP SP2

A much touted feature in SP2 (Service Pack 2) since then removed was the ability to do just this, have a user logged on locally while another connects to the terminal remotely. Microsoft however removed the feature in the final build. The reason probably is that the EULA (End User License Agreement) allows only a single user to use a computer at a time. This is (IMHO) a silly reason to curtail Remote Desktop’s functionality, so we’ll have a workaround.

Microsoft did try out the feature in earlier builds of Service Pack 2 and it is this that we’re going to exploit here. We’re going to replace termserv.dll (The Terminal Server) with one from an earlier build (2055).

To get Concurrent Sessions in Remote Desktop working, follow the steps below exactly:

  1. Download the termserv.zip file below and extract it somewhere. (You have to be registered to see the file)
  2. Reboot into Safe Mode. This is necessary to remove Windows File Protection.
  3. Copy the termserv.dll in the zip to %windir%\System32 and %windir%\ServicePackFiles\i386. If the second folder doesn’t exist, don’t copy it there. Delete termserv.dll from the dllcache folder: %windir%\system32\dllcache
  4. Merge the contents of Concurrent Sessions SP2.reg file into the registry.
  5. Make sure Fast User Switching is turned on. Go Control Panel -> User Accounts -> Change the way users log on or off and turn on Fast User Switching.
  6. Open up the Group Policy Editor: Start Menu > Run > ‘gpedit.msc’. Navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Terminal Services. Enable ‘Limit Number of Connections’ and set the number of connections to 3 (or more). This enables you to have more than one person remotely logged on.
  7. Now reboot back into normal Windows and try out whether Concurrent Sessions in Remote Desktop works. It should!

If anything goes wrong, the termserv_sp2.dll is the original file you replaced. Just rename it to termserv.dll, reboot into safe mode and copy it back.

The termserv.dl_ file is provided in the zip is for you slipstreamers out there. Just replace that file with the corresponding file in the Windows installation disks.

I’ve added in extra information from the comments below… thanks for all who researched! 🙂

Other links of interest:

    • MSFN Board, termserv.dll
    • Another related MSFN thread.
    • Another similar HOWTO
    • An installer for the above

Please note that I haven’t tried out any of the links above. YMMV.

If anything doesn’t work with my procedure above though, post a comment here and I’ll try to help!…